Olive Eggs??

As a keeper of chickens, I subscribe to a few websites that periodically give advice or information, but as I have been keeping chickens for over 20 years, I don’t usually find a lot of new information, tho’ its always useful to keep informed of the ‘latest trends’ – smile.

But this time, I did find something new!  Countryside Network, an American website has me stumped!  Did you know you can mix breeds to give you an olive coloured egg?

20160413_1052201-500x375Except they don’t look very olive to me!

AND WHO WOULD WANT AN OLIVE COLOURED EGG ANYWAY?

I’m wondering whether this is a hoax, but it seems, from the list of suppliers of mixed breeds, that it’s actually an advert!

Testimonial from an Olive Egger chicken owner: “I had really wanted to add some olive green eggs to my egg basket for a long time, and was concentrating more on the egg color than on the chicken breed itself, but now having raised Olive Egger chickens for several years, I can tell you that they are some of my favorite hens. Mine are a cross between a Black Ameraucana and a Black Copper Marans, so they’re solid black with the trademark Ameraucana cheek puffs, and one has the feathered feet of a Marans too! Unlike Marans who I find a bit standoffish, and Amerauanas which can be skittish, their offspring, the Olive Egger chicken, is a chatty, friendly hen who I think has retained some of the best qualities of each of their parents. My Olive Eggers are more consistent layers than my Ameraucanas, which is nice. They are extremely cold-hardy, but don’t seem overly bothered by heat either. They are on the smallish side, definitely more Amerauana-sized than Marans-sized, but their eggs are good-sized. They are fairly talkative chickens, but they tend to chatter quietly and rarely cluck loudly. They have been a wonderful addition to my backyard flock.” – Lisa Steele, from FreshEggsDaily.com

olive-egger-chicken

Comb: Varies

Popular Use: Eggs and meat

Varieties
: None recognized, as this is not a standard breed

Temperament
: Varies

Skin Color
: Varies

Weight: Usually large, but varies based on breeding

It really isn’t an Olive Egger chicken if it is
: Not a cross. Favaucanas, Ameraucanas, and Aruacanas have been known to lay greenish eggs from time to time, but are not considered Olive Egger chickens.

MAKE YOUR OWN MIND UP ABOUT THIS!  I HAVE TO ADMIT THAT MOST OF THEIR POSTS ARE QUITE HELPFUL IF YOU KEEP ANY TYPE OF ANIMAL – BUT THIS SEEMS IDIOTIC TO ME!

And – talking about crossing breeds – I’m pleased to report that 7 out of the 9 eggs I put in the incubator just over three weeks ago, from my free range mix of Buff Sussex and Speckled Sussex breeds have hatched (plus a few silkie eggs I bought) and I will be taking some photographs of them soon, to show you – smile.

You can see the pure breed pictures here and here.

 

And a few more chicks ….

chicks in lakeland box – Version 2

This is the second lot of chicks I hatched a few weeks ago, they are about 2 or 3 days old here.  Once again, eggs I bought thro’ ebay.  They are another batch of  buff sussex, from an address far away from the supplier of the first lot, so that I can be sure that they are unrelated and I’ll be able to breed them – which is the plan.  Hopefully I’ll have a few chicks to sell in the spring/summer, and later some very pretty hens at their point of lay.

DSCF2431

the same chicks before I found a box for them!

There are also some white silkies in this batch – all are growing well – in fact, I have had to replace this box with a much larger one – but first –

king of the water bottle

this buff sussex chick has managed to jump up on the water bottle – and is now wondering how to get down again!

Their new ‘temporary’ home – they are about 3 weeks old here – and have grown so big that I had to give them two brooders – those things in the box with them – they provide heat for the chicks, and keep them comfortable.

chicks at 3 wks